Shibari

Shibari is a kind of bondage, formed in Japan at the beginning of the XX century, and in the late forties and early fifties it became popular all over the world. The main features of the shibari were attention to such a side of bondage as the psychological interaction of the Top with the model, and the sexual side of bondage action. Another feature of the shibari is the aesthetics and often rather high complexity of the strapping schemes with the simplicity of the nodes. All these features are explained by the fact that shibari appeared as a public art, for demonstration on stage and images in painting and photography. There are also some specific techniques borrowed from the traditional combat and police tying hodge-jutsu. For binding in shibari, ropes from natural materials (mainly jute) are used. The word shibari comes from the Japanese 縛り and is pronounced "sibari", from the verb "sibaru" - to bind. Also the name "kinbaku" used (or kim baku, from the Japanese 緊縛 "to bind tightly". Being part of bondage, shibari has common with other types of techniques and safety rules.

 

Appearance of shibari. Emerged in Japan in the first half of the 20th century art of erotic bonding, widely spread after the Second World War, was originally an element of Kabuki-style performances. Shibari is originally a theatrical performance, where the Master demonstrates both his technique of binding, and the ability to feel the model, sexually arouse her with the help of straps, leading to an orgasm or subspace. Although the painful harnesses in the shibari show are usually not used, this approach made shibari popular among Japanese sadomasochists. Subsequently shibari spread throughout the world, including with the help of returning US servicemen from Japan, who brought fashion to Europe and the US, both in "ordinary" and in sadomasochistic clubs. On the basis of these clubs later formed a modern BDSM subculture, in which shibari, along with other types of bondage, painful practices, role-playing games and many others, has become an integral part from the outset. And the fact that shibari developed not only in the environment of sadomasochists, led to the fact that there are Shibarist communities (as well as bondage fans in general) who do not consider themselves to be a subculture of BDSM.

 

Bondage festivals. There are a number of shibari festivals, including: Toubaku in Japan, London Festival of the Art of the Japanese Rope Bondage in London, BondCon in Chicago, BoundCon in Munich, RopeFest in St. Petersburg and MoscowKnot in Moscow.